STOP THE FEDS – SIGN THIS PETITION for Medical Marijuana!!!!!

Everyone Sign This Petition & Send it to Everyone You know! We still need over 18,800 signatures to stop the Feds from Shutting down all CA Dispensaries!

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions#!/petition/stop-all-current-doj-dea-ondcp-and-irs-attacks-against-medical-cannabis-dispensaries-california/FkSf2Y1w

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San Diego Medical Marijuana Dispensaries In Limbo

Click the link below to read the original article by Jen Lebron Kuhney at Sign On San Diego:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/jul/25/san-diego-medical-marijuana-ordinance-smoke/

Medical marijuana dispensaries within San Diego city limits are once again in legal limbo after the City Council voted Monday to repeal regulations that created — ever so briefly — a path to legitimacy for those businesses.

The council opted to rescind the rules they adopted four months ago rather than pay as much as $1 million on a public vote, a decision that was forced when a coalition of medical marijuana advocates collected enough signatures from registered voters to place a repeal on a future ballot.

The 6-2 council vote puts the contentious issue right back where it was when civic debate began two years ago: Medical marijuana collectives in San Diego are illegal. But, as before, it is unclear whether the city will take any action to shutter them.

This is the second time this year that the City Council has been forced to repeal legislation following a signature drive. In February, the panel reversed an ordinance that would have required an economic impact study for proposed supercenters after Walmart objected and quickly amassed signatures to trigger a public vote.

The city approved comprehensive — but heavily debated — rules on medical marijuana businesses in the spring that would have forced the city’s roughly 160 dispensaries to shut down and apply for operating permits. Cooperative owners and medical marijuana patients decried the rules as being too strict while some community leaders said anything short of an outright ban didn’t go far enough.

People on both sides of the debate urged the council on Monday to simply repeal the restrictions and avoid a costly election.

The repealed regulations dictated specific operating procedures for the collectives and required a 600-foot buffer zone between one another, as well as from schools, playgrounds, libraries, child-care and youth facilities, parks and churches.

Citizens for Patients Rights, a coalition of patients and providers submitted more than 46,000 signatures to the city in May to require a public vote on the new rules. That left the City Council with a choice: Repeal the ordinance or pay to put it on a ballot.

County Registrar of Voters Deborah Seiler estimated the election costs would be as much as $1 million — a price tag most council members said was too high for a measure that had strong opposition from such a wide spectrum of groups.

“Some people would vote against it because in their minds the ordinance went too far and was too permissive, others would vote against it because the ordinance didn’t go far enough and we would be back at square one,” Councilwoman Sherri Lightner said. “Given the cost of the election, it would be like sending close to a million dollars up in smoke.”

The decision leaves the city with no comprehensive policies regarding where or how a collective can operate legally.

Rachel Laing, a spokeswoman for Mayor Jerry Sanders, said it will be up to code compliance officers to investigate complaints against collectives and tell the owners what they need to do to address any problems.

Medical marijuana dispensaries are not a permitted use under current codes. The only way a dispensary could comply with city rules would be for it to shut its doors.

Whether the city enforces that law is another matter. Such code violations generally weren’t pursued before the ordinance was passed.

Eugene Davidovich, the local chapter coordinator for Americans for Safe Access, said he hopes to see medical marijuana advocates propose a new ordinance to the City Council or try to create new regulations through the city’s Planning Commission.

Davidovich said the new ordinance would likely be more in line with what an advisory marijuana task force recommended when the issue was being debated last summer. Those rules would differ from the repealed measure by allowing dispensaries in a wider variety of commercial and industrial zones, which medical marijuana advocates say are necessary to make sure the sickest patients have access to their medicine.

But the task force’s recommendations are far too broad for those who hope San Diego will follow the lead of a dozen California counties in banning dispensaries.

Councilman Carl DeMaio originally voted against the ordinance because he believed it did not go far enough. “There is a very difficult policy process that now we have to follow and … one potential outcome would be no law with enforcement actions taken without any sort of regulation or potentially a very clear law that enacts a moratorium or ban,” he said.

Council members Marti Emerald and Tony Young voted against the repeal, saying the public should make the decision about whether the previously adopted rules were appropriate.

Kenneth Cole, the owner of One on One, a collective just blocks away from City Hall in downtown, said he hopes the repeal of the ordinance does not result in sweeping store closures.

“I think there are going to be unintended consequences for both sides, but I hope this doesn’t mean raids and a return to the wild, wild West,” Cole said. “These patients deserve to be treated with respect.”

The repeal vote came on the same day backers of a new statewide ballot initiative to decriminalize marijuana began collecting signatures.

In 2010, a ballot measure to legalize the recreational use of pot failed with 53 percent of Californians and San Diegans voting against it.

jen.kuhney@uniontrib.com • (858) 480-9582 • Twitter @jenkuhney

Posted in Marijuana Laws, Medical Marijuana Edibles, Medicinal Marijuana, Repeal the Ban, San Diego Marijuana Laws | 1 Comment

What is Your Favorite Type of Medical Marijuana Edible?

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San Francisco Medical Marijuana Edibles Laws (Part 2)

Medical Cannabis Dispensary (MCD) Regulations for Preparation of Edible Cannabis Products continued:

5.      Packaging that makes the product attractive to children or imitates candy is not allowed. Any edible cannabis product that is made to resemble a typical food product (i.e. brownie, cake) must be in a properly labeled opaque (non see-through) package before it leaves the dispensary. Deliveries must be in properly labeled opaque packages when delivered to the patient.

A.     Photos or images of food are not allowed on edible medical cannabis product labels.

B.      If the edible medical cannabis product is identified on the label using a common food name (i.e. Brownie, Honey, Chocolate, Chocolate Chip Cookie, or Green Tea), the phrase “MEDICAL CANNABIS” must be written before the common food name. This phrase must be as easy to read as the common food name (i.e. same font size).

C.      Only generic food names may be used to describe the product. As an example, using “Snickerdoodle” to describe a cinnamon cookie is prohibited.

6.      Individuals conducting the manufacturing or sale of products shall thoroughly wash their hands before commencing production and before handling the finished product. Gloves must be worn when packaging edible cannabis products.

7.      In order to reduce the likelihood of foodborne disease transmission, individuals who are suffering from symptoms associated with acute gastrointestinal illness or are known to be infected with a communicable disease that is transmissible through foodstuffs are prohibited from preparing edible cannabis products until they are free of that illness or disease, or are incapable of transmitting the illness or disease through foodstuffs. Anyone who has sores or cuts on their hands must use gloves when preparing and handling edible cannabis products.

8.      Edible cannabis products for sale or distribution at an MCD must have been prepared by a member of that MCD. No non-member edible cannabis products are allowed for sale or distribution at an MCD.

9.         A patient/caregiver who produces edible cannabis products that are sold at more than one MCD in San Francisco must become a State certified food handler. If more than one person is involved in producing edible cannabis products at one home or facility, only one person needs to be certified. The valid certificate number of the member who has prepared the edible cannabis product must be on record at the MCD where the product is sold or distributed, and a copy of the certificate kept either on-site, or made available during inspections if kept off-site.

10.  Labels must contain:

1.      Manufacture date

2.      The statement “Keep Out Of Reach Of Children”

3.      The statement “For Medical Use Only”

4.      Net weight of cannabis in package

Visit the Edibles List for more information regarding Medical Marijuana Laws.

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San Francisco Medical Marijuana Edibles Regulations

Medical Cannabis Dispensary (MCD) Regulations for Preparation of Edible Cannabis Products

1.      No edible cannabis products requiring refrigeration or hot-holding shall be manufactured for sale or distribution at an MCD, due to the potential for food-borne illness. Exemptions may be granted by the San Francisco Department of Public Health on a case-by-case basis. For such exempted edible cannabis products, DPH may require a HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) plan before approving the distribution of such medical cannabis products at MCDs. Such products requiring a HACCP plan may include ice cream and other dairy products.

2.      Baked medicinal products (i.e. brownies, bars, cookies, cakes), tinctures and other non- refrigerated type items are acceptable for manufacture and sale at MCDs.

3.      (Items noted in this section are advisory only, as DPH does not intend to regulate edible cannabis production occurring in one’s home.) Preparation may be completed in a home-type kitchen equipped with a sink available for hand washing (this sink may be a dishwash sink), liquid soap, and paper towels. No other food preparation should take place during the production of edible cannabis products, in order to avoid cross- contamination. During preparation, children and pets should not be in the kitchen/preparation area. Clean and sanitize all utensils, equipment, and food contact surfaces before and after preparation. Equipment and food contact surfaces should be in good, cleanable condition. Ingredient storage areas should be kept clean and vermin-free.

4.      All items shall be individually wrapped at the original point of preparation.

Labeling must include a warning if nuts or other known allergens are used, and must include the total weight (in ounces or grams) of cannabis in the package. A warning that the item is a medication and not a food must be distinctly and clearly legible on the front of the package. The package label must have a warning clearly legible emphasizing that the product is to be kept away from children. The label must also state that the product contains medical cannabis, and must specify the date of manufacture.

For more information about the laws affecting Medical Marijuana Edibles please visit the Edibles List.

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San Francisco Edibles Regulations by Michelle Aldrich

Modern cannabis use reawakened in the 1950’s and exploded in the late 1960’s, but cannabis has been smoked, drunk, eaten and rubbed on the body, since humans first discovered the plant.
In 1954, Alice B. Toklas published the famous recipe for Hashish Fudge, given to her by Brian Gysin, who was one of William Burroughs’ lovers.
It was a Moroccan recipe made from spices, nuts, fruits and cannabis. She cautioned that 2 pieces were quite enough and to be prepared to laugh hysterically. This was the beginning of modern cannabis edibles.
San Francisco is the only place with regulations for edibles. I believe the regulations that we have put into place are logical and are based on a sound public health sanitation model.
The regulations start with the kitchen, where the edible is made. The chef can use a home kitchen, as long as it has a sink for hand washing, liquid soap and paper towels.
The kitchen must be certified only, if the edibles are distributed to more than one MCD, and in that case the chef must become a State certified food handler.
You must clean and sanitize all utensils, equipment, and surfaces that food may come in contact with, before and after preparation. Storage areas should be kept clean and vermin-free.
“Cleanliness is next to Godliness,” so says the ancient Hebrew proverb and the San Francisco Health Department.
During preparation, you should not be preparing any other food, and children and pets should not be in the area.
The preparer should thoroughly wash their hands before starting and before handling the finished product. Gloves must be worn when packaging cannabis products.
San Francisco requires edibles to be in opaque packaging, so children cannot see what is inside.
Labeling must include a warning, if nuts or other known allergens are used, and must include the total weight of cannabis in the package.
Cannabis edibles must be individually labeled at the point of preparation and must specify the date of manufacture.
The label must have a warning, that the product contains cannabis. That, it is a medication and not a food and should be kept away from children.
Baked medicinal products (i.e. brownies, bars, cookies, cakes), tinctures and other non-refrigerated items are acceptable for manufacture and sale at MCD’s.
Dispensaries can only sell edibles, that a member has prepared. No non-member edible cannabis products are allowed for sale or distribution at an MCD.
No edible cannabis products requiring refrigeration or hot-holding (such as ice cream or hot chocolate) shall be manufactured for sale or distribution at an MCD,
due to the potential of food-borne illness.
What regulations are still needed? Should they be made by the industry or by the government?
Better instructions on the package. I had a drink package that I was supposed to add water to, but it didn’t tell me how much water to use.
How many doses are there in the package? A common question… and what is one dose?
Nutritional Facts…Product Testing for potency including the exact amount of THC in the edible
and where to ask the question….Who made this shit anyway?
What about the future?
San Joaquin County wants the handling and preparation of edible cannabis products to comply with current California Health and Safety Code requirements.
Colorado wants to do vertical integration as a closed loop commercial scheme. They want licenses for the medical marijuana centers and the medical marijuana infused product licensee. They want to institute a tracking system from seed to product.
What will edibles look like in a year?
Better packaging, no cannabis taste,
Identifying the potency
Better knowledge of the ingredients.
Better Customer service, quality control,
Potency, packaging, consistency and innovation!
Every state, county and city will sooner or later institute their own regulations on marijuana and edibles.
San Francisco’s regulations on edibles will prove to be a rational approach and a model for future regulation.
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